Tip 1: Balance

Are you struggling with your position? Is your horse lacking in its performance?
You may be faced with a Saddle Balance issue.

Watch this informative video for some saddle fit tips on Balance that may help you!

Balance: Too High in Front

Do you feel you are struggling to get balanced in the saddle and are feeling tipped back? Are you struggling with getting your horse engaged or is it experiencing back issues?

If your saddle is too high off the horse’s withers or too low in the back, this will cause a lot of excess uneven pressure on the horse’s loins. It will not only put you in the wrong position, but it will be very difficult for your horse to engage as it will be unable to come through with its back and step underneath itself into a correctly engaged frame.

Balance: Too Low in Front

Do you feel tipped forward in the saddle? Is your horse resisting?

If your saddle is too low in front, it will pinch the horse’s shoulder – which is very restrictive for your horse! In this situation, your saddle may be too wide in the front or too high in the back. Not only will this cause discomfort for your horse but you will also be forcing yourself to sit in an unnatural position that may affect your riding or strain the discs in your lower back!

Steps to check Saddle Balance:

  1. Remove your saddle pad and irons. Place your saddle over the withers and slide it right back behind the shoulder blade. On a dressage saddle, the cantle should be a little higher than the pommel.
  2. Take a small round object (like a pencil) that will roll. Place it on the seat of the saddle and observe. If the saddle is balanced the pencil should rest in the center of the seat. If it rolls too far forward – the pommel is too low (cantle too high). If it rolls too far back, the saddle is too low in the cantle (pommel too high). It will be very difficult in either of these situations for both horse and rider to balance properly!

The horse will be much more comfortable in a well balanced saddle, because the weight of the rider will be distributed over a larger area. The saddle will not be driven into the shoulder or back on the loin. With correct balance the rider will be able to use the 4 curves in her back as natural ‘shock absorbers’, and she will sit balanced on their seat bones. This good posture means she will be able to lean forward and backward without the lower or upper leg swinging back and forth.

Is this a challenge you are facing? Are you experiencing other saddle fit issues? Tell us about them and let us help!

Contact miriam@schleese.com or solutions@schleese.com, book a Personal Saddle Fit Evaluation, or attend an educational lecture/demo.

Find an event near you

Equine Professional
Testimonials

Jochen saved my horse - even the vet school couldn’t provide an explanation of his symptoms. Understanding how the horse dictates saddle fit added a whole new dimension to my practice and helped countless clients and their horses. Passion for true horsemanship brings us all together. Thank you to Jochen Schleese.  Jochen saved my horse’s career, and in doing so, shaped mine.  Even the vet school couldn’t provide an explanation of his symptoms. Understanding how the horse dictates saddle fit added a whole new dimension to my practice and helped countless clients and their horses.   The saddle fitting material in my book “Recognizing the Horse in Pain and What You Can Do About It” is largely due to your years of experience and passion for teaching. Passion for true horsemanship brings us all together.” My post-graduation experience of seeing numerous records filled with refills for steroids and antibiotics or frequent, needless joint injections soon left me desperately searching for a better way to practice. The ensuing experience (meeting with Certified Master Saddler Jochen Schleese) changed my life, and subsequently changed the lives of the horses I’ve been able to work with. When I met Jochen Schleese, the founder of Saddlefit 4 Life® and listened to his in-depth explanation of how saddle fit affects the horse, I had a revelation. Here was someone who could put all the pieces together for me with compassionate understanding for the horse. I will admit, when I understood how much pain I had caused my horse, and how he had continued to try to do his job for me in the face of that pain, I cried uncontrollably. Now I was armed with something different in making the decision – the knowledge of my horse’s anatomy, how it dictated proper saddle fit...and an option to correct his problems and continue to enjoy riding my horse knowing he is free of pain.”   Recognizing the Horse in Pain and What You Can Do About it - Video Icon for Website How to Use Thermography

— Joanna Robson DVM, CVSMT, CMP, CVA and Owner of Inspiritus Equine

Recent Comments

    Meta