ONTARIO EQUESTRIAN FEDEATION (OEF)

 

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As Ontario’s provincial sport organization for equestrian the OEF is committed to equine welfare and providing leadership and support to individuals, associations and industries in Ontario’s horse communities. Committed to the highest standards of horse welfare, advocacy, pursuits and accessibility, the OEF represents more than 22,000 members from all sectors of the horse industry including professionals, amateurs, competitors and recreational enthusiasts of all ages and disciplines.  The OEF provides leadership and support to the individuals, associations and industries in Ontario’s equine community.

OEF provides educational material for new riders, coaches and competitors on a variety of topics:

  • safety  (helmet, prevention of concussion and brain injuries, road safety, stable safety)
  • horse health (finding a veterinarian, health and care)

OEF offers a variety of educational programs including:

  • learn to ride programs – national rider level testing program to teach English and western riders safe horsemanship and practices
  • Ride ON reward program for riders
  • Clinics for coaches, instructor examination,  national certification programs in both English and Western disciplines as well as long term athlete development
  • Officials Programs to become a provincially or nationally certified judge, steward or course designer
  • Trail Guide certification

The OEF quarterly member publication – WHOA – includes industry updates, member achievements and information about events. Schleese is a proud business member, Gold Sponsor and educational partner of the OEF.

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Equine Professional
Testimonials

The riding school where I first took lessons had "good" saddles, made by a venerable European manufacturer, so when I noticed my riding was uncomfortable, I assumed a problem with my position. Eventually though, I realized that no position was comfortable, that riding varied from unpleasant to excruciating. Nobody else seemed to have a problem, and my instructor was not a person with whom anyone discussed non-public parts of the body, so I just accepted that riding was painful. Until I rode in a friend's saddle, made by another venerab1e European manufacturer. It was an old saddle, but the moment I sat in it I was like Goldilocks in Baby Bear's chair -it was just right. Painless! Amazing! So I measured, compared, tried other saddles; then my husband made me foam blocks that I placed next to my stirrup bars to widen the saddle waist until I could buy a used saddle-shaped -like-me. If I or my instructor had had Jochen Schleese's important book “Suffering In Silence”, I would have been spared years of pain and frustration. It seems an unfortunate human tendency to take no steps toward a solution unless the ultimate solution is achievable, like the onlooker who wondered why to throw a single starfish in the sea if they couldn’t all be saved.  I can’t afford to buy custom saddles for my school horses, but there are many things I can do, with the information in Mr. Schleese's book, to make my horses and my students more comfortable. Correct diagnosis is vital to solving problems, and its information that you need to make a diagnosis, like the significance of saddle length, gullet width, equine asymmetry, billet placement, cantle angle, and many other features of the interface between rider and horse. Little, inexpensive things like foam blocks can make the difference between painful and painless for both the equines and the humans you are responsible for, if you have the information that comes from Mr. Schleese's experience, we may not be able to do everything, but we should do what we can.

— Katie Aiken, Riding Instructor Magazine Copy Editor Fall 2014

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